Helmet FAQ

We sell a wide variety of motor sports helmets. Whether you are going out for a ride on your motorcycle, headed to the drag strip in your car, down the trail on your snowmobile or dirt bike we have you covered!

We offer helmets from HJC, Shoei, 509, and Zamp.

All the helmets we sell are DOT certified. Following that they will also be ECE or Snell approved in most cases as well. 

Here are some quick helmet facts.

1. You should replace your helmet every 3-5 years

2. If your helmet takes more then a 4 foot drop, or is involved in an impact you need to replace it.

3. Never borrow or buy a used helmet! Helmets will form to the shape of your head over time making your helmet only safe for yourself!

4. Store your helmet in a cool dry place, try and keep the helmet in an environment under 122 degrees.

5. Helmets are designed for only 1 impact.

6. Never use insect repellent around you helmet, it can damage the foam and shell.

 

DOT Ratings
DOT stands for Department of Transportation.
This is the US government approved standard and the
most popular helmet type in the country. DOT helmets are
more shock absorbent and designed at protecting your skull
from 90% of impact types. The maximum g-force allowed
by the DOT test is 250g’s, and an impact of 200-250g’s to your head
would cause a survivable, yet harsh brain injury. DOT helmets
favorite shock absorbancy due to recent studies claiming
that absorbing the force of an impact if more important
than resisting it.DOT stands for Department of Transportation.
This is the US government approved standard and the
most popular helmet type in the country. DOT helmets are
more shock absorbent and designed at protecting your skull
from 90% of impact types. The maximum g-force allowed
by the DOT test is 250g’s, and an impact of 200-250g’s to your head
would cause a survivable, yet harsh brain injury. DOT helmets
favorite shock absorbancy due to recent studies claiming
that absorbing the force of an impact if more important
than resisting it.
Snell Ratings
For years the darling of the helmet industry, the SNELL Memorial
Foundation is still largely considered the gold standard for helmet
safety. SNELL M2015 certification uses the most aggressive anvil
profile, known as an edge anvil, and demands a ridiculously low
275 g maximum energy transfer after two blows. SNELL testing is
designed with the energy levels and safety requirements of the
racetrack in mind, and this is reflected in the additional testing for
characteristics such as stability and ease of removal in an
emergency. One key difference between SNELL and every other
helmet standard is the high level of control the helmet technician
has over the testing process. SNELL technicians look for the
weakest point in the helmet — say, at a metal visor snap or
mechanical hinge — and target that point when testing.
Technicians will strike multiple locations, testing until they are
satisfied an accurate indication of the helmet’s energy-management
ability has been attained. SNELL will also conduct “helmet autopsies,”
examining the EPS liner and internal components for signs of weakness.
For years the darling of the helmet industry, the SNELL Memorial
Foundation is still largely considered the gold standard for helmet
safety. SNELL M2015 certification uses the most aggressive anvil
profile, known as an edge anvil, and demands a ridiculously low
275 g maximum energy transfer after two blows. SNELL testing is
designed with the energy levels and safety requirements of the
racetrack in mind, and this is reflected in the additional testing for
characteristics such as stability and ease of removal in an
emergency. One key difference between SNELL and every other
helmet standard is the high level of control the helmet technician
has over the testing process. SNELL technicians look for the
weakest point in the helmet — say, at a metal visor snap or
mechanical hinge — and target that point when testing.
Technicians will strike multiple locations, testing until they are
satisfied an accurate indication of the helmet’s energy-management
ability has been attained. SNELL will also conduct “helmet autopsies,”
examining the EPS liner and internal components for signs of weakness.
ECE Ratings
The ECE 22.05 helmet was made by the
United Nations Economic Commission for Europe,
and is the most common helmet standard
used internationally used by over 50 countries
worldwide. Helmets certified to ECE 22.05
are approved for all competition events by AMA,
WERA, FIM, CCS, Formula USA and MotoGP
and are used by almost every professional
motorcycle racer competing in world
championship road racing, motocross and off-road
events. It is very similar to the DOT standard
as it favours a more impact-absorbent helmet
allowing a maximum g-force of 275.
The ECE has more in common with DOT than Snell,
and is likely to pass the DOT test and vice-versa.
The ECE 22.05 helmet was made by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe,and is the most common helmet standard
used internationally used by over 50 countries
worldwide. Helmets certified to ECE 22.05
are approved for all competition events by AMA,
WERA, FIM, CCS, Formula USA and MotoGP
and are used by almost every professional
motorcycle racer competing in world
championship road racing, motocross and off-road
events. It is very similar to the DOT standard
as it favours a more impact-absorbent helmet
allowing a maximum g-force of 275.
The ECE has more in common with DOT than Snell,
and is likely to pass the DOT test and vice-versa.